Queen Street Studios (QSS) was established in 1984 to facilitate a growing need for artist studio spaces in Northern Ireland. Since this time the studios have provided a vital system of support for professional artists based in Belfast.

QSS currently provides thirty seven subsidised studio spaces at the The Arches Centre for artists who work in various mediums and who are at different career stages (see below).

Sean Campbell

Sean Campbell

As an artist I work with the elements of colour, texture, line and form. I sculpt, digitize, animate and play. Essentially I manipulate light and space, presenting work left open to interpretation and interaction. Inspired through years of travel and an empirical interest in anthropology, using the creative process inherent within art to navigate what I believe to be an increasingly complex world. I encourage you to spend time, to engage, to continue the journey I have begun with these few simple marks and manipulations.

Gerard Carson

Gerard Carson

Gerard Carson practice is concerned with the contingency of matter in the context of accelerated modes of technological production, ecological breakdown, and the indeterminate vectors of their effects/affects. By working via a speculative methodology, Carson’s works take the form of precarious assemblages comprised of bio-plastics and concrete, where computer modelling and 3D printers act as techno-symbiotic agents in the assemblage’s manifestation.

Hannah Clegg

Hannah Clegg

Hannah Clegg graduated from Belfast School of Art in 2017, BA Hons Fine Art (Painting), receiving the Dean's List Award. Since then, her work has been shortlisted and exhibited in Dublin as part of the RDS Visual Art Awards (2017), has been included in a range of selected group shows within Belfast (2017-2018), and most recently a solo exhibition in Ards Arts Centre, Newtownards (2019).

Rachael Colhoun

Rachael Colhoun

The artist’s approach is abstract and non-representational, instead focussing on the emotional feeling created by place. The aim is to challenge how visual imagery is perceived, encourage audiences to ask “How does the image make me feel?” rather than simply “what is it meant to be?”

Susan Connolly

Susan Connolly

Recent exhibitions include solo shows at Platform Arts Belfast (2018), The Ashford Gallery, RHA, Dublin and QSS Belfast (2017), The Lab, Dublin and dlrLexicon, Dun Laoghaire, Dublin (2015).

Amanda Coogan

Amanda Coogan

Amanda is an internationally recognised and critically acclaimed artist working across the medias of live art, performance, sculpture and installation. The Irish Times have said, 'Coogan, whose work usually entails ritual, endurance and cultural iconography, is the leading practitioner of performance in the country'. Her extraordinary work is challenging, provocative and always visually stimulating. Using gesture and context she makes allegorical and poetic works that are multi-faceted, and challenge expected contexts. She is one of the most dynamic contemporary artists practising in live art. 

Mary Cosgrove

Mary Cosgrove

Mary Cosgrove was born in Belfast and was first trained in painting and drawing by T.P. Flanagan RHA, RUA.  She taught in government schools in Zimbabwe (Rhodesia) and Zambia for seven years, illustrating school material and government history courses while continuing to paint.

Alacoque Davey

Alacoque Davey

The central tenet of my work lies in the duality of absence and presence and the ambiguity of empty space. I use clay, paint, plaster, wire, wood and paper to produce imagery and objects which explore this space.The works I produce as an artist are a response to the feelings and events I experience and my attempt to organise harmony and create some order out of dissonance; a space where only the essential remains and all other distraction quietened.’

Catherine Davison

Catherine Davison

My work is primarily about freedom, expressed through the medium of paint. My aim is to create a sensory experience through visual hyperbole. I use bright colours and rhythmic patterns to stir up the senses and draw attention to the vitality of nature.

Gerry Devlin

Gerry Devlin

Gerry Devlin's work operates in a space between formal abstract investigation and a psychologically charged visual enquiry. Essentially self referential, the paintings nonetheless incorporate both a contemplative and oblique visual narrative in deploying images of fragments, objects and motifs from the commonplace, to the personal, to the museum artefact. The paintings explore and reflect notions of individual and collective memories and histories without recourse to anatomical confines, infusing inanimate forms with a sense of human loss, fragility and resilience. 

Craig Donald

Craig Donald

Donald's work deals with our understanding and interpretation of the past. History and memory are dismantled and recombined to form layers of meaning, opening a forum to examine the systems and boundaries of visual communication.  This is investigated with particular reference to the means of collection, interpretation and dissemination of information; with an emphasis on human attempts at control and the areas where these can fail.

Dan Ferguson

Dan Ferguson

I undertake many commissions and portraits, and in my own personal work I have spent a lot of time exploring the mechanics of memory.From that I started looking at the notion of perception, and ‘fused horizons’, (how we all affect each other with our experiences and observations). These memories can be mine, or belong to others, and they seem to be channelled into a colour scheme that tries to displace the conventional sepia of nostalgia, and instead evoke a spectrum exploding timelessness. These are stoic, political, romantic, playful, and terrifying experiences, but they don’t tend to address an issue head on. There is often a difficult narrative that can obfuscate, mislead, and deny a reading, as much as it can invite one.

Joy Gerrard

Joy Gerrard

Drawing on over a decade of image-making and research on themes of protest and urban space, Irish artist Joy Gerrard archives and painstakingly remakes media-borne crowd images from around the world. Her crowds are viewed from above, suggesting the remove of media observation, while the fluidity and drama of their moment is expressed through precise, expressive mark-making. The large paintings allow a shift in scale, disrupting the photographic schema of the smaller drawings, thus allowing greater freedom from the original mediation of the image.

Angela Hackett

Angela Hackett

Born in London, Angela completed a BA. Hons in Fine Art from the National College of Art & Design in Dublin in 1994 and an MA.Contemporary Visual Art at University College Falmouth in 2005.

Karl Hagan

Karl Hagan

My paintings follow my investigation into the dual nature of human existence. I found that in making the paintings I was drawn to paint people and places where I have simply enjoyed being or have some form of comfort in and with. It is within these rooms and places where I begin to deconstruct the architecture, furniture and objects to rebuild an exploded version of what was there before...

Andrew Haire

Andrew Haire

Andrew Haire's work explores the traditional subject matter of landscape painting viewed within the context of our modern and ever increasingly digital society.

Ciaran Harper

Ciaran Harper

Harper's most recent art work is ethnic inspired, with his dissertation written on the theory of Diaspora and how this can be translated in Art. His mixed Irish and Caribbean roots play an important part in his background and images. Cultural theorist Stuart Hall declares that the "Western World" has the power to make us see and experience ourselves as "Other"; referring to the Caribbean as the home of "hybridity".

David Haughey

David Haughey

David Haughey is an artist living and working in Belfast. He graduated in 2001 from the BA (Hons) Fine Art course at Ulster University and began research toward a PhD at The Belfast School of Art in Autumn 2017. His practice-based research folds together installation practice and the image, with a particular focus on the temporality of the site of production and display.

Amy Higgins

Amy Higgins

Amy Higgins has a Fine Art honours degree as well as recently completing a two-year long Master’s degree, both awarded by the Ulster University. She received a distinction for her master’s degree in which she developed ideas around Barbara Creeds monstrous feminine, the sublime, the uncanny and Hannah Arendt’s notions around the human condition.

Ashley B. Holmes

Ashley B. Holmes

Ashley B. Holmes lives and works in Belfast, Northern Ireland.  She studied fine art in the USA and obtained a BFA in Painting from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston, and an MFA in Painting from the University of Colorado in Boulder.  She also holds a Master of Art from Chelsea College of Art and Design in London, UK. 

Dorothy Hunter

Dorothy Hunter

My practice is based upon the ways in which space and society interact. My work so far has been rooted in the element of removal that accompanies inherited history, and the stages where, due to the associations of their pasts, elements are not comfortable in artistic appropriation or have not found any “appropriate” form.

Frédéric Huska

Frédéric Huska

I am a photographer. In photographing the city, I remap it intuitively and libidinally. I distort it. Places in the city are turned inward, into a mental space, into a projection of my own desires and deceptions. I do not speak of this city, of which I know very little, but speak from within the city. I am a tourist.

Sharon Kelly

Sharon Kelly

Kelly’s practice focuses and gravitates around drawing, incorporating moving image, stop-motion animation, painting and print, exploring themes relating to the human condition - with emphasis on the mind/body synergy. Responding, creating, doubting, obliterating, re-working and re-stating are characteristic elements of her work, revealing the creative process itself.

Eleni Kolliopoulou

Eleni Kolliopoulou

The topics of my works are poetic and philosophical and they tackle indirectly social/ issues. I create atmospheres to express feelings and thoughts having my lived experience as a starting point. Performance is a medium that I use because I perceive the body as a container and conveyor of body-mind intelligence where different strata of experience take place and unfold.

Rachel Lawell

Rachel Lawell

Rachel Lawell is a visual artist specialising in fine art painting, based in Belfast. In 2016, Lawell graduated form Belfast School of Art with a BA Honours Degree (2;1). Lawell went on to study a Master’s degree at Queens University Belfast in Film and Visual Studies (2017) where she graduated in with Commendation.

Clement McAleer

Clement McAleer

The focus of McAleer’s paintings, primarily landscape; not the particularities of place, but rather the restless, shifting aspects of nature where cloud or water, land or sea transforms themselves atmospherically, one into another. The Irish coast is a dominate source and the memory of it lurks everywhere in the studio. Travels in Europe have inspired a new body of work particularly in the series of railway paintings from Italy, Germany and the Netherlands, where a stronger emphasis on structure again entered the work. Sometimes a visible grid is created and then submerged, abstracting each painting, serving also to release it slowly as the sense of ‘being there’ establishes itself.

Terry McAllister

Terry McAllister

My work is landscape-based - carried out at a scale which reveals the inherent physical patterns underlying the apparently random nature of landscape composition; conferring the images with an abstract quality. At this level, it becomes evident that these minutiae are unique, complex, intriguing and worthy of closer attention.

Mark McGreevy

Mark McGreevy

McGreevy is the recipient of many awards including the Suki Tea Prize, a number of Arts Council of Ireland Bursary Awards, and Arts Council NI SIAP award. He has been shortlisted for prestigious art prizes such as The AIB Award and BOC Emerging Artist Award and has participated on artist residency programmes at Centre Culturel Irlandais, Paris; the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin; The Ballinglen Arts Foundation, Mayo

Meadhbh McIlgorm

Meadhbh McIlgorm

Her work is influenced by phenomena that move beyond the tangible - in particular the ephemeral nature of light, shadow and reflection. The unique qualities of glass, including its fragility, lend themselves to creating a narrative around these phenomena through sculptural objects, installation and photography.

Sinead McKeever

Sinead McKeever

McKeever's practice is process lead; through experimentation and rigorous editing she explores the possibilities of found industrial and domestic materials. Ockhams’s Razor, the principle of parsimony (“Plurality should not be posited without necessity”) informs her way of thinking. She integrates the fluxus idea of the simple gesture as part of the process of creating. Minimalist sensibilities are reinterpreted and a more organic, ornamental response is incorporated.

Michelle McKeown

Michelle McKeown

Michelle McKeown is a practising artist based in Belfast currently undertaking doctoral research in painting and feminist theory at Ulster University. Her recent practice operates at the intersection of painting and digital printing technologies.

Sharon McKeown

Sharon McKeown

Concentrating on the relationship of the figure in a man-made space, McKeown is concerned with how connections can be built. The characters, usually in solitude, sit waiting but not necessarily wanting for anything; recharging and calm in their own habitat. Responding to her own feelings of happiness in solidarity, the artist explores themes of life and what living entails, the doubt, the sacrifice, the belief, and the happiness.

Grace McMurray

Grace McMurray

Labour intensive craft processes such as weaving and sewing explore a self-reflexive subject, expanding an understanding of experience, drawing and tactility, through form and content.

Jane Rainey

Jane Rainey

“She has great flair and ability with paint, but always strives to second-guess herself, never settling for the lure of facile effects, always upping the ante.” Aidan Dunne, The Irish Times

Gail Ritchie

Gail Ritchie

Currently undertaking a PhD with practice at QUB, researching memorial forms. Previously a member of Backwater Artists Group Cork before relocating to Belfast and joining Queen Street Studios in 2003. Since then, her practice has centred on making, writing and curation of exhibitions locally and internationally.

Charlie Scott

Charlie Scott

The focus of Scott’s work gravitates towards the broad questions of time and memory. Growing up surrounded by the silent bogs, lakes and halted railway lines below Mount Errigal in Co. Donegal; he is concerned with the spiritual qualities of nature. He challenges concepts of the ‘landscape’ and it’s placement amongst today’s charged visual culture.

Vasiliki Stasinaki

Vasiliki Stasinaki

Through my work I attempt to question and explore my place in the world from a social and political point of view by creating performative interventions that take place in a defined space. I am interested in building environments and creating situations that induce a specific emotional state in the audience by prompting it to observe, question and participate.

Anushiya Sundaralingam

Anushiya Sundaralingam

My work is influenced by the connected notion of a ‘self’ in transition and the challenges of identity as well as the nature of belonging, identity and place. I am interested in my relationship with the space in which I find myself; how my natural and cultural environment shapes my sense of self and place.

Jennifer Trouton RUA

Jennifer Trouton RUA

Jennifer Trouton is a figurative painter who deliberately uses the tools and materials of the past to subtly express ideas around gender, class and identity within Irish history; combining an interest in the mythological, the historical and personal narrative with meticulous technique and aesthetic appeal.

David Turner

David Turner

David Turner is a Belfast based artist who creates autobiographical work through toy mediums that reflect conflict, terrorism and evoke critical commentary on present day violence and war.

Trevor Wilson

Trevor Wilson

The focus of my work is not stuck within a specific theme, but rather using photography and film as a tool to explore people and places. Creating photographs, which together encapsulate a sense of visual poetry.